Funds available for those looking for Long Island jobs

May 8th, 2015

For laid off workers seeking Long Island jobs, some funds may be available.

To help workers find new jobs, the U.S. Department of Labor is making $150 million available through the new Sector Partnerships National Emergency Grant program to help states develop innovative employment and training services that focus on enhanced regional and industry-specific collaborations.

The effort is designed to support proven strategies to help people rejoin the job market and add fuel to the economy.

Sector partnerships are employer-driven partnerships of industry, education and training, and other stakeholders that focus on the workforce needs of key industries in a regional labor market.

This initiative will encourage the development of training strategies based on these partnerships to better address regional workforce needs.

The funding will be used to help states offer new services such as regional sector planning, enhanced career services to dislocated workers, and work-based training opportunities.

Grantees will also develop strong partnerships between workforce and industry organizations and align services with other federal, state or local programs, such as Unemployment Insurance, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, Wagner-Peyser Employment Service, and Trade Adjustment Assistance programs. Funds will also be used to provide services such as:

Comprehensive skills assessments, intensive coaching, relocation assistance, and other short-term, specialized services culminating in direct job placement;
Short-term training and work-based learning opportunities such as OJT leading to employment; and
Accelerated skills training, with a focus on work-based training that leads to industry-recognized credentials and employment such as registered apprenticeship.

Employers looking to fill Long Island nursing jobs

May 4th, 2015

A WANTED Technologies survey finds that employers may be looking to fill Long Island nursing jobs, among other locations.

The results of a recent staffing firm survey shows that nursing and IT jobs are those most likely to require the support of third-party recruiting agencies to be filled.

By analyzing jobs posted online specifically by staffing firms and the increase or decrease in market demand, WANTED is able to determine the occupations that employers are most likely to bring on an external staffing specialist to fill. This research can be used by both corporate recruiters and staffing firms to create actionable talent sourcing strategies.

Employers may be able to reduce the time-to-fill and cost-per-hire by enlisting a third party agency that specializes in these areas and has the industry-specific resources to connect with qualified candidates.

All of the jobs identified as high volume for staffing agencies experienced general year-over-year growth in employment.

The top occupations that employers are likely to hire a staffing firm are registered nurses, application software developers, and web developers. Staffing agencies recruited for 25% more registered nurses in 2014 than in prior years.

The growth in healthcare can be attributed to healthcare legislature in the US and increased availability of medical care. IT positions accounted for 70% of occupations on this list. IT hiring will continue to grow as companies realize the potential that software has to increase productivity and customer sales.

Not all Long Island non-desk jobs require a degree

April 19th, 2015

There are some high paying Long Island non-desk jobs that don’t require a four-year degree, according to a survey from Careerbuilder.

Ninety percent of the twenty highest paying non-desk jobs are in health care and most require a doctoral or professional degree, according to the analysis. Many of the fast-growing non-desk jobs, however, do not require a four-year degree or higher, and several offer workers a direct path to the middle class in a variety of industries.

In all, there are 170 non-desk occupations that pay $15 per hour or more on average, do not require a four-year degree for a typical entry-level position, and have seen six percent job growth from 2010-2014.

Dental Hygienists
Diagnostic Medical Sonographers
Occupational Therapy Assistants
Elevator Installers and Repairers
Boilermakers
Rotary Drill Operators, Oil and Gas
Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers
Signal and Track Switch Repairers

For this study, non-desk jobs are defined as any occupation where the majority of the average worker’s time spent on the job would be away from a desk. Many occupations have core responsibilities split between a desk/office and non-stationary or field work – e.g. engineering occupations, power plant technicians/operators, real estate brokers, etc.

Retail jobs in Long Island grow

April 7th, 2015

The number of retail jobs in Long Island have possibly grown, according to the latest employment press release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In March, employment in retail trade continued to trend up (+26,000), in line with its prior 12-month average gain. Within retail trade, general merchandise stores added 11,000 jobs in March.

Employment in mining declined by 11,000 in March. The industry has lost 30,000 jobs thus far in 2015, after adding 41,000 jobs in 2014. The employment declines in the first quarter of 2015, as well as the gains in 2014, were concentrated in support activities for mining, which includes support for oil and gas extraction.

Employment in food services and drinking places changed little in March (+9,000), following a large increase in the prior month (+66,000). Job growth in the first quarter of 2015 averaged 33,000 per month, the same as the average monthly gain in 2014.

Employment in other major industries, including construction, manufacturing, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Employment in professional and business services trended up in March (+40,000). Job growth in the first quarter of 2015 averaged 34,000 per month in this industry, below
the average monthly gain of 59,000 in 2014. Within professional and business services, employment continued to trend up in architectural and engineering services (+4,000), computer systems design and related services (+4,000), and management and technical consulting services (+4,000).

Health care continued to add jobs in March (+22,000). Over the year, health care has added 363,000 jobs. In March, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+19,000) and hospitals (+8,000), while nursing care facilities lost jobs (-6,000).

Food service jobs in Long Island burgeon

March 30th, 2015

Food service jobs in Long Island may be growing, according to the latest release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In February, food services and drinking places added 59,000 jobs. The industry had added an average of 35,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Employment in professional and business services increased by 51,000 in February and has risen by 660,000 over the year. In February, employment continued to trend up in management and technical consulting services (+7,000), computer systems design and related services (+5,000), and architectural and engineering services (+5,000).

Construction added 29,000 jobs in February. Employment in specialty trade contractors rose by 27,000, mostly in the residential component. Over the past 12 months, construction has added 321,000 jobs.

In February, employment in health care rose by 24,000, with gains in ambulatory care services (+20,000) and hospitals (+9,000). Health care had added an average of 29,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs in February, with most of the gain occurring in couriers and messengers (+12,000). Employment in transportation and warehousing grew by an average of 14,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Employment in retail trade continued to trend up in February (+32,000) and has grown by 319,000 over the year.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

What do people with CEO jobs in Long Island have in common?

March 24th, 2015

People who have CEO jobs in Long Island have some characteristics in common, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

Only 1 in 5 executives (20 percent) consider a business suit typical office attire. Most executives (57 percent) outfit themselves in business casual clothing, while 18 percent regularly wear jeans or shorts to work.

Black is the clothing color of choice for 32 percent of executives, making it the most popular choice for this group. Navy blue is the second most popular color worn by executives (31 percent), followed by grey (10 percent).

Most executives (79 percent) take themselves to work in an automobile, with 1 in 4 (24 percent) driving an SUV, 1 in 5 (22 percent) opting for a mid-sized sedan, and 1 in 10 (10 percent) cruising around in luxury sedan.

More than 3 in 5 of executives (62 percent) abstain from drinking alcoholic beverages at company happy hours. Instead, they opt for soda (23 percent), water (19 percent), coffee (13 percent) or nothing at all (7 percent). Thirteen percent of executives kick back with a beer, and the same number (13 percent) opt for wine, while 8 percent opt for mixed drinks.

Right-handers outnumber left-handers by nearly 7 to 1 (80 percent versus 13 percent); however, 8 percent of executives claim to be ambidextrous.

When it comes to parting their hair, 3 in 10 executives (29 percent) favor the right side, 19 percent go down the middle, and 15 percent part on the left. One in four (25 percent) don’t part their hair at all, while 11 percent sport a shaved or bald head.

When asked how many hours they work in a typical week, 40 was the minimum for most head honchos. Fifty-eight percent of executives say they work 40 to 49 hours a week, and 32 percent work 50 hours or more. Only a lucky few (9 percent) say they work less than 40 hours a week.

Manufacturing jobs in Long Island trend up

March 8th, 2015

The number of manufacturing jobs in Long Island are possibly trending upwards, according go statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Transportation and warehousing added 19,000 jobs in February, with most of the gain occurring in couriers and messengers (+12,000). Employment in transportation and warehousing grew by an average of 14,000 per month over the prior 12 months.

Manufacturing employment continued to trend up in February (+8,000). Within the industry, petroleum and coal products lost 6,000 jobs, largely due to a strike.

Employment in mining decreased by 9,000 in February, with most of the decline in support activities for mining (-7,000).

Employment in other major industries, including wholesale trade, information, financial activities, and government, showed little change over the month.

Construction added 29,000 jobs in February. Employment in specialty trade contractors rose by 27,000, mostly in the residential component. Over the past 12 months, construction has added 321,000 jobs.

In February, employment in health care rose by 24,000, with gains in ambulatory care services (+20,000) and hospitals (+9,000). Health care had added an average of 29,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

In February, the average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was 34.6 hours for the fifth month in a row. The manufacturing workweek was unchanged at 41.0 hours in February, and factory overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.4 hours.

The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 33.8 hours.

Confidential info about Long Island jobs left out in the open?

March 2nd, 2015

Some employees report in a recent Careerbuilder survey that they have seen confidential or private information about Long Island jobs or other jobs left out or in the trash.

More than a few support staff workers mentioned seeing evidence that workers were engaging in some Not Suitable for Work (NSFW) behaviors during the off-hours. Other curious workplace discoveries included the following:

A list of employee salaries.
Picture of partially-dressed co-worker.
Layoff and compensation paperwork.
Upcoming reorganization diagram.
An old love letter from one person in the office to another.
A predetermination request for a breast augmentation.
A short story about the boss and several co-workers cast in an unflattering light.
A pregnancy test.
An employee’s response to a personal dating ad.
An employee’s resume on the copier.
A letter from the boss’s mistress.
The boss’s ex-wife’s bank account statement.
An employee’s tax return.
Stolen event tickets.
A diamond ring.
A passport.
A full key set for the facility.

Fifty-three percent of support staff workers have overheard confidential conversations at work, according to the survey, and 11 percent of support staff workers have stumbled upon information that could cause someone to be fired.

One in ten support staff workers (10 percent) have found something in the trash or lying around the workplace that could get a worker or the company in trouble. A similar amount (11 percent) say they have knowledge about an executive or co-worker that could be grounds for that individual’s dismissal.

Senior workers delaying retiring from Long Island jobs

February 20th, 2015

A new survey from Careerbuilder shows that senior workers are delaying retirement from Long Island jobs or plan on working after retirement.

The number of workers age 60 or older currently delaying retirement reached a post-recession low of 53 percent. This number is down from 58 percent last year and 66 percent in 2010.

75 percent of workers age 60 or older currently delaying retirement cite the recession as a cause. Twelve percent don’t think they will ever be able to retire – up slightly from 11 percent last year – and nearly half (49 percent) feel retirement is at least 5 years out.

Fifty-four percent of senior workers (age 60+) say they’ll work after retiring from their current career – up from 45 percent last year. Of this group, 81 percent say they’ll most likely work part-time, while 19 percent plan to continue working full-time. Customer service, retail and consulting are the three most common jobs these workers plan to pursue.

Meanwhile, one in six workers age 60 or older say they are taking this time in their life to pursue a dream job or passion project.

Seniors out of work or planning to work post-retirement, the job search may be getting easier. Fifty-four percent of private sector employers hired mature workers (age 50+) in 2014 – up six points from last year’s 48 percent – and 57 percent plan to do so in 2015.

At 78 percent, the inability to retire due to household financial situations is the clear number one reason senior workers delay retirement. The need for health insurance and benefits follows at 60 percent.

Construction jobs in Long Island grow

February 8th, 2015

The number of construction jobs in Long Island keeps growing, according to the latest statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Construction added 48,000 jobs in December, well above the employment gains in recent months. Specialty trade contractors added jobs in December (+26,000), with the gain about equally split between residential and nonresidential contractors.

Employment also increased in heavy and civil engineering construction (+12,000) and in nonresidential building (+10,000).

Employment in food services and drinking places increased by 44,000. The industry added an average of 30,000 jobs per month in 2014.

Health care added 34,000 jobs in December. Job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+16,000), nursing and residential care facilities (+11,000), and hospitals (+7,000). Employment growth in health care averaged 26,000 per month in 2014 and 17,000 per month in 2013.

Manufacturing employment increased by 17,000, with durable goods (+13,000) accounting for most of the gain. Manufacturing added an average of 16,000 jobs per month in 2014, compared with an average gain of 7,000 jobs per month in 2013.

Employment in retail trade changed little in December, following a large gain in November. Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, transportation and warehousing, information, and government, changed little in December.

Employment in wholesale trade and in financial activities continued to trend up in December.

Employment in professional and business services rose by 52,000 in December. Monthly job gains in the industry averaged 61,000 in 2014. In December, employment increased in administrative and waste services (+35,000), computer systems design and related services (+9,000), and architectural and engineering services (+5,000).

Employment in accounting and bookkeeping services declined (-14,000), offsetting an increase of the same amount in November.

The unemployment rate declined by 0.2 percentage point to 5.6 percent in December, and the number of unemployed persons declined by 383,000 to 8.7 million.