Manufacturing jobs in Long Island added?

December 8th, 2017

A number of manufacturing jobs in Long Island have been added.

The unemployment rate was unchanged at 4.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

Employment increased by 228,000 in November. Employment continued to trend up in professional and business services, manufacturing, and health care. Employment growth has averaged 174,000 per month thus far this year, compared with an average monthly gain of 187,000 in 2016.

Employment in professional and business services continued on an upward trend in November (+46,000). Over the past 12 months, the industry has added 548,000 jobs.

In November, manufacturing added 31,000 jobs. Within the industry, employment rose in machinery (+8,000), fabricated metal products (+7,000), computer and electronic products (+4,000), and plastics and rubber products (+4,000). Since a recent low in November 2016, manufacturing employment has increased by 189,000.

Health care added 30,000 jobs in November. Most of the gain occurred in ambulatory health care services (+25,000), which includes offices of physicians and outpatient care centers. Monthly employment growth in health care has averaged 24,000 thus far in 2017, compared with an average increase of 32,000 per month in 2016.

Within construction, employment among specialty trade contractors increased by 23,000 in November and by 132,000 over the year. Employment in other major industries, including mining, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government, changed little over the month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours in November.

In manufacturing, the workweek was unchanged at 40.9 hours, and overtime remained at 3.5 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 33.7 hours.

Are you negotiating jobs offers for Long Island jobs?

December 8th, 2017

Many may be leaving money on the table when negotiating for Long Island jobs.

A recent CareerBuilder survey found that the majority of workers (56 percent) do not negotiate for better pay when they are offered a job. Those who avoid it say they don’t attempt it because they don’t feel comfortable asking for more money (51 percent), they are afraid the employer will decide not to hire them (47 percent), or they don’t want to appear greedy (36 percent).

Fifty-three percent of employers say they are willing to negotiate salaries on initial job offers for entry-level workers, and 52 percent say when they first extend a job offer to an employee, they typically offer a lower salary than they’re willing to pay so there is room to negotiate. But how much money is being left on the table? More than a quarter of employers who offer a lower salary (26 percent) say their initial offer is $5,000 or more less than what they’re willing to offer.

Age: The survey found that a new hire’s willingness to negotiate the first job offer may come with more experience. Forty-five percent of workers 35 or older typically negotiate the first offer, which is higher than workers ages 18-34 (42 percent).

Gender: Nearly half of men (47 percent) say they negotiate first offers, compared to 42 percent of women who say they do.

Industry/function: Information technology workers (59 percent) are the most likely to negotiate salary, followed by sales (55 percent), financial services (53 percent) and health care workers (48 percent).

When asked what motivates workers to do their job, 71 percent say the ability to provide for themselves and their families, followed by money (63 percent), the ability to make a difference (38 percent) and the ability to create something meaningful or cool (21 percent).

While finances are a top priority for workers, 79 percent say they do not earn their desired salary – with more than a third (36 percent) say they don’t earn anywhere near it – and more than half (58 percent) say they do not think they are better off financially than their parents.

 

Are workers running errands during Long Island jobs?

November 29th, 2017

A new Careerbuilder survey finds that workers may be calling in sick for Long Island jobs but then running errands instead.

According to new CareerBuilder data, 40 percent of workers have called in sick in the last 12 months when they weren’t, compared to 35 percent in 2016 and 38 percent in 2015. Female workers were more likely than their male counterparts to take sick days when they were well – 43 percent to 35 percent respectively.

While they may not necessarily be sick, 30 percent of workers who have called in sick cite having a doctor’s appointment as the top reason to take a sick day, followed by just didn’t feel like going to work (23 percent), needing to relax (20 percent), and needing to catch up on sleep (15 percent).

Running errands (14 percent), catching up on housework (8 percent), and plans with family and friends (8 percent) also appeared on the list.

Over a third of employers (38 percent) have checked up on a worker who called in sick to make sure he or she was actually sick, and 26 percent have fired a worker for calling in sick with a fake excuse (up from 22 percent last year).

Forty-three percent have caught an employee lying about being sick by checking out their social media posts, up from 34 percent last year.

When checking up on an employee who called in sick, 64 percent of employers required a doctor’s note, 46 percent called the employee, 25 percent had another worker call the employee, and 22 percent drove by their house or apartment.

Over a third of workers (37 percent) come into the office when they are under the weather so they can save their sick days for when they are feeling well. Fifty-eight percent say they come into work when they’re sick because otherwise the work won’t get done, and 48 percent come into work because they can’t afford to miss a day of pay.

 

Healthcare jobs in Long Island grow

November 8th, 2017

A number of healthcare jobs in Long Island are increasing, according to recent labor statistics.

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 261,000 in October, and the unemployment rate edged down to 4.1 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

The unemployment rate edged down by 0.1 percentage point to 4.1 percent in October, and the number of unemployed persons decreased by 281,000 to 6.5 million.

Employment increased by 261,000 in October, after changing little in September (+18,000). Employment in food services and drinking places increased sharply over the month, mostly offsetting a decline in September that largely reflected the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. In October, employment also increased in professional and business services, manufacturing, and health care.

Manufacturing employment rose by 24,000 in October, with job gains in computer and electronic products (+5,000) and chemicals (+4,000). Employment in fabricated metals continued to trend up (+4,000). Manufacturing has added 156,000 jobs since a recent employment low in November 2016.

Health care added 22,000 jobs in October. Employment in ambulatory health care services continued to trend up over the month (+16,000).

Health care has added an average of 24,000 jobs per month thus far in 2017, compared with an average gain of 32,000 per month in 2016.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, and government, changed little in October.

 

Manufacturing jobs in Long Island grow

November 8th, 2017

New labor statistics posit that manufacturing jobs in Long Island may be growing.

Employment in food services and drinking places increased sharply, mostly offsetting a decline in September that largely reflected the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. In October, job gains also occurred in professional and business services, manufacturing, and health care.

Employment in food services and drinking places rose sharply in October (+89,000), following a decrease of 98,000 in September when many workers were off payrolls due to the hurricanes.

Professional and business services added 50,000 jobs in October, about in line with its average monthly gain over the prior 12 months. Manufacturing employment rose by 24,000 in October, with job gains in computer and electronic products (+5,000) and chemicals (+4,000).

Employment in fabricated metals continued to trend up (+4,000). Manufacturing has added 156,000 jobs since a recent employment low in November 2016.

Payroll employment increased by 261,000 in October, after changing little in September (+18,000). Employment in food services and drinking places increased sharply over the month, mostly offsetting a decline in September that largely reflected the impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey.

In October, employment also increased in professional and business services, manufacturing, and health care.

Are workers negotiating for Long Island jobs?

October 29th, 2017

A new CareerBuilder survey finds that workers may not be negotiating for Long Island jobs.

The majority of workers (56 percent) do not negotiate for better pay when they are offered a job. Those who avoid it say they don’t attempt it because they don’t feel comfortable asking for more money (51 percent), they are afraid the employer will decide not to hire them (47 percent), or they don’t want to appear greedy (36 percent).

While most job candidates avoid negotiating, the majority of employers are expecting a counteroffer. Fifty-three percent of employers say they are willing to negotiate salaries on initial job offers for entry-level workers, and 52 percent say when they first extend a job offer to an employee, they typically offer a lower salary than they’re willing to pay so there is room to negotiate. But how much money is being left on the table? More than a quarter of employers who offer a lower salary (26 percent) say their initial offer is $5,000 or more less than what they’re willing to offer.
Age: The survey found that a new hire’s willingness to negotiate the first job offer may come with more experience. Forty-five percent of workers 35 or older typically negotiate the first offer, which is higher than workers ages 18-34 (42 percent).

Gender: Nearly half of men (47 percent) say they negotiate first offers, compared to 42 percent of women who say they do.

Industry/function: Information technology workers (59 percent) are the most

When asked what motivates workers to do their job, 71 percent say the ability to provide for themselves and their families, followed by money (63 percent), the ability to make a difference (38 percent) and the ability to create something meaningful or cool (21 percent).

While finances are a top priority for workers, 79 percent say they do not earn their desired salary – with more than a third (36 percent) say they don’t earn anywhere near it – and more than half (58 percent) say they do not think they are better off financially than their parents.

Further, while only 8 percent have current salaries of $100,000 or more, 21 percent say they feel they need to earn $100,000 or more in order to be successful.

Long Island adds jobs

October 6th, 2017

The state of New York continues to grow, and Long Island jobs have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

In August 2017, the state’s private sector job count rose by 1,700, or less than 0.1%, to 8,094,500. This marked the fifth consecutive month in which the state’s economy has added private sector jobs.

Since the beginning of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s administration, New York State’s economy has added more than one million private sector jobs and experienced employment growth in 68 of the past 80 months. In August 2017, New York’s statewide unemployment rate increased from 4.7% to 4.8%.

The state’s private sector job count is based on a payroll survey of 18,000 New York employers conducted by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. Monthly payroll employment estimates are preliminary and subject to revision as more data become available the following month.

The federal government calculates New York State’s unemployment rate based partly upon the results of the Current Population Survey, which contacts approximately 3,100 households in New York State each month.

“The State’s private sector job count has now risen for five consecutive months and in seven of the eight months thus far this year. In August 2017, New York’s private sector employers added 1,700 jobs,” said Bohdan M. Wynnyk, Director of the New York State Department of Labor’s Division of Research and Statistics.

Twelve metro areas in New York State added private sector jobs over the past year, with the most rapid employment growth in these areas:

  • New York City (+2.4%)
  • Orange-Rockland-Westchester (+2.2%)
  • Kingston (+2.1%)
  • Dutchess-Putnam (+2.0%)
  • Utica-Rome (+1.3%)
  • Binghamton (+1.1%)

Long Island finance jobs remain stable

October 6th, 2017

The newest labor statistics are out, and they demonstrate that Long Island finance jobs may be stable.

Employment was little changed in September (-33,000), after adding an average  of 172,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

In September, a steep employment decline in food services and drinking places and below-trend growth in some other industries likely reflected the  impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey. Employment rose in health care and in transportation and  warehousing.

Employment in food services and drinking places dropped sharply in September (-105,000), as many  workers were off payrolls due to the recent hurricanes. Over the prior 12 months, food services  and drinking places had added an average of 24,000 jobs per month.

In September, health care added 23,000 jobs, in line with its average monthly gain over the prior  12 months (+27,000). The employment increase in ambulatory health care services (+25,000) was partially offset by a decline in nursing care facilities (-9,000).

Employment in transportation and warehousing increased by 22,000 in September. Job gains occurred in warehousing and storage (+5,000), couriers and messengers (+4,000), and air transportation (+3,000).

Employment in financial activities changed little in September (+10,000). A job gain in insurance  carriers and related activities (+11,000) largely reflected hurricane-recovery efforts. The gain was  partly offset by losses in activities related to credit intermediation (-4,000) and in commercial banking (-3,000). Over the year, financial activities has added 149,000 jobs.

In September, employment in professional and business services was little changed (+13,000). Over the prior 12 months, job growth in the industry had averaged 50,000 per month.

Manufacturing employment was essentially unchanged in September (-1,000). From a recent employment trough in November 2016 through August of this year, the industry had added an average of 14,000 jobs per month.

Employment in other major industries, including mining, construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, information, and government, showed little change over the month.

Total nonfarm payroll employment was little changed in September (-33,000), after adding an average of 172,000 jobs per month over the prior 12 months.

Healthcare jobs in Long Island spotlighted

September 9th, 2017

Several events are placing healthcare jobs in Long Island in the spotlight.

HRHCare Community Health hosted several events across its Hudson Valley and Long Island network of health centers for National Health Center Week. To officially kick-off the start of the week,Congressman Peter King and Assemblywoman Kimberly Jean-Pierre joined HRHCare executives and CHCANYS CEO Rose Duhan for a tour of the HRHCare Amityville Health Center.

The official HRHCare “National Health Center Week Van” then hit the road across the ten-county HRHCare service area for staff appreciation and outreach events for the remainder of the week. Special open houses were held at HRHCare health centers in Poughkeepsie, Goshen, and Southampton, attended by patients, community partners, and representatives of elected officials.

National Health Center Week is designated by the National Association of Community Health Centers every August as a time to celebrate America’s community health centers (CHCs) for their incredible work. This year’s National Health Center Week theme was “Celebrating America’s Health Centers: The Key to Healthier Communities.” CHCs are the primary medical home for over 25 million people of all ages in nearly 10,000 rural and urban communities across the country.

The CHC model combines the resources of local communities with federal funds to establish neighborhood health centers. They are consumer-driven (over half of the board is required to be made up of patients), and empower communities to establish direct health services at the local level. CHCs enjoy bipartisan support from administrations and elected officials at all levels, but they also need the support of their communities to thrive and bring health care access to even more individuals.

Company expands, creates legal jobs in Long Island

September 7th, 2017

One company is expanding and creating more legal jobs in Long Island.

Nixon Peabody is expanding its Labor & Employment practice in Long Island with the arrival of new partner Jeffery A. Meyer, whose practice encompasses a wide range of labor & employment matters, from traditional labor law to wage-and-hour law.

Meyer as defended employers before various state and federal courts, as well as many federal, state and local administrative agencies with matters relating to wage-and-hour collective and class actions, discrimination, retaliation and ERISA. He frequently appears before the National Labor Relations Board representing employers in matters related to union organizing and collective bargaining.

“Our clients will benefit from Jeff’s strong litigation experience before federal and state courts and agencies,” said Eric Paley, leader of Nixon Peabody’s Labor & Employment practice. “Jeff delivers efficient and cost-effective defense strategies aligned with our clients’ business objectives, and he’ll be a great addition to our national labor and employment practice.”

Joining Nixon Peabody from Kaufman Dolowich & Voluck, LLP, Jeff graduated from St. John’s University School of Law and earned a B.S.B.A. in Business Management from Bucknell University. Outside of the office, Jeff sits on the advisory boards of Make-A-Wish Foundation of Greater New York and the Viscardi Center.